Micro-Bac

Biosecurity Plan

Do you have a Biosecurity Plan?

adaptions from the EPA website & MBI

Biosecurity is the protection of agricultural animals and biological waste from the environment from any type of infectious agent — viral, bacterial, fungal, or parasitic. Using Micro-Bac products for agricultural use such as Mega-Bac, an eco-friendly, non-chemical based product, will keep your animals healthy. People can spread diseases as they move within a facility and from one facility to another. Animals or equipment introduced into a facility can bring pathogens with them. Among the many biosecurity procedures that can prevent these types of disease transmission are such measures as use of protective clothing, waiting periods for new animals and visitors, and cleaning.

The following people need to be aware of biosecurity procedures:

  • livestock and poultry industry event planners
  • livestock and poultry producers
  • animal industry workers
  • animal health officials
  • food processors
  • foreign travelers, and local hosts expecting foreign visitors.he following people need to be aware of biosecurity procedures:
  • livestock and poultry industry event planners
  • livestock and poultry producers
  • animal industry workers
  • animal health officials
  • food processors
  • foreign travelers, and local hosts expecting foreign visitors.

Identify risk factors that affect how diseases are introduced or spread such as:

  • bringing new animals to the herd, coup or pen
  • failure to quarantine
  • failure to require disease testing before introducing animals
  • animals returning from fairs and shows
  • allowing other animal contact with cross specie, feeds or water
  • allowing spread through people, vehicles, or equipment

To consider:

  • multiple maternity housing
  • using maternity area for sick animals
  • failure to separate sick from healthy animals
  • using manure-handling equipment to mix feed or to feed with
  • Manure-contaminated drinking water (use Mega-Bac X)
  • feeding contaminated feeds
  • feeding unpasteurized whole milk, waste milk or colostrum to calves
  • Animal contact with cows, feed or water
  • Failure to vaccinate
  • Allowing spread via people, vehicles, or equipment
  • Improper and/or lack of disinfectant use, or hygiene practices